Are You A Introvert

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Introverts are far outnumbered by extroverts in our modern world. We make up about 30% of the general population. Being introverted simply means that you live a very rich and colorful inner life that doesn’t require anyone else for completion. This is not to say that introverts don’t form long lasting love relationships or friendships: they do. But to the introvert, time alone is fundamental to happiness and well-being. While most introverts enjoy social interchange, it must be balanced with time alone to return to a state of inner peace.

So, do you think you are an introvert? If so, you probably began to show signs as a child. Introverted children are generally more thoughtful and apt to ask questions that show a depth of understanding that extroverted children lack. They enjoy playing alone and like activities that involve being by themselves such as artistic projects, reading, writing, playing a musical instrument or listening to music. They don’t require the social stimulation that most children need to be content. Situations that involve large groups of people may be particularly exhausting to the introverted child, but balancing this interaction with quiet time is an effective method of dealing with the exhaustion.

As the introvert matures, the signs become more noticeable. Most introverts excel at careers that involve a solitary work environment. They are capable of being in a position that deals with the general public as long as some alone time is available after work and on the weekends. Ideally, an introvert will be found toiling away in an isolated place where they can be alone with the inner workings of their mind. Creative pursuits can be very rewarding. Most writers and artists are introverted people. Research and other independent endeavors work out well for the introvert as well. Introverts do their best work alone with no distractions. Multi-tasking may be challenging because the concentration is divided. Focusing on one project at a time is the most effective way to achieve success.

Can you decline social invitations without feeling like you’re missing out? Introverts don’t feel compelled to accept every party or dinner invitation. Unlike extroverts, they don’t find social engagements a necessity and, quite often, prefer the downtime at home rather than the life of a proverbial social butterfly. While an extrovert might regret having to turn down an invitation, introverts don’t really mind. This shouldn’t be a matter of concern for the other people in the introvert’s life. It’s just the way we are!

Finding an appropriate mate as an introvert is not always easy. A committed, loving relationship is just as important to us as it is to an extrovert, but we have to be a little more selective. Two introverts in a relationship can actually work fine as long as one of you is willing to leave the house for supplies now and then! You must be careful to be sure that your lives don’t grow progressively smaller–excluding social interaction. Getting involved with an extrovert works well, too, if the extrovert is capable of understanding your need for time by yourself. The extrovert must also realize that your need for alone time is not a reflection of your love for them or a need to escape their company. Usually, once they experience how rattled you can become because of no time by yourself, they’ll cooperate in giving you the distance you need to make the relationship work.

The mind of the introvert works differently than the mind of the extrovert. While extroverts make decisions based on outside information and sources, introverts make decisions based on their own inner promptings. These inner promptings combine personal experience, emotions, and a “gut feeling” rather than concrete reasoning. This does not mean that introverts are bad decision makers. They just go about the decision making in a different way. They find answers within themselves rather than from an outside force.

How big is your circle of trusted friends? If you’re a true introvert, you probably have many acquaintances, but not many close friends. It’s sometimes difficult for an introvert to let outsiders into their own little world. It works better for us to have a few very close friends who are welcomed into our homes and allowed to fully experience our special cocoons. While an extrovert enjoys commotion and frequent visitors, introverts try hard to avoid those things. The home of an introvert is truly a haven that must be protected from intrusion.

Still think you fit the profile? You’re in good company if you do! Introverted people are more apt to be gifted intellectually and have far more creative potential than extroverts. We are full of self-knowledge which contributes to our understanding of others. We are intense people, prone to daydreams, and are frequently lost in thought. Foster your introverted nature and use it as your unique source of power. It is a gift and should be treated as such!

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Victoria Jane Bennett

Victoria Jane Bennett

Victoria Jane Bennett is a freelance writer and is very active in local theater in Illinois. She holds a Creative Writing degree from Eastern Illinois University.
Victoria Jane Bennett

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